Tuesday, 26 January 2010

Cara Cara

Last summer I wrote a little bit about the Irish singer Cara Dillon and her album 'Hill of Thieves'. I've been listening to that album again this week and I would have to say it is very much my favourite CD of last year. It is totally folk but with a very modern interpretation in places - at times it sounds like the album Kate Bush might have made if she'd ever gone Irish folkie (and that's a compliment, I assure you...Kate Bush is brill). Here's another song from 'Hill of Thieves' (and I picked this clip because some of the live ones cut off before the end or had poor quality sound). There is a link between this song and my last post too...not a very subtle one. It seems my passion for all things Irish continues apace too (and we had Irish-American John Doyle at the folk club last week and he was EXCELLENT!).




x

12 comments:

Liz said...

Love the song! Thanks!

Rachel Fox said...

The whole album is just lovely, Liz.
x

Totalfeckineejit said...

Was ever a better song written? She has the face and voice of an angel.Beautiful rendition but as clean and cold as glass.This is the Devil's song,I'm afraid you need a bit of mileage under your belt and dirt under your fingernails for this one.

Useless bit of info #456 Cara means friend in Irish.

Titus said...

Some voice, and I liked the sparseness of the arrangement, but find TFE's comment rather interesting too. Who else has done it that can be easily heard/found? (sorry for lack of knowledge, you know I'm a metalhead).

Rachel Fox said...

Not at all useless info, TFE! Cara means 'dear' (both senses) in Spanish (hence the post heading).

As for her version of this song...it is one of the things I've found interesting about listening to folk in the past few years (hearing how different people interpret the big, popular songs). Sure, her version is different to some of the others (about a million versions on youtube Titus...just put the title into its search) but that's the point...different singers try the same songs in their own way. It happens in pop to a certain extent (and gets called cover versions) but it is a huge part of folk - everyone having a go at the same songs. It all builds up the idea that it's the song that matters more than the singer.

As I said last time I wrote about her it took me a while to love Cara's voice...it does seem so slight and perfect. But I have grown to love it and I think all the arrangements on this album are just gorgeous.

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Rachel Fox said...

I think I heard her on the radio talking about this album and saying that after her children were born she found herself singing them all the old songs she knew best and that made her want to record them.

When our Girl was a baby (not knowing many folk songs then) I found myself singing her 'Raindrops keep falling on my head'! I won't be putting out a single version...

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Rachel Fenton said...

Half thought TFE was going to end with - "but I haven't listened to it yet" or similar!


Hmn, I thought it was nice - I liked that she didn't over egg it, but I wasn't "feeling" it either... like me singing to the kids at bedtime! Only more talented and less stressed! I think I would need to hear the other songs before I decided...but I want to hear the other songs, that's good - reckon she's a grower!

Rachel Fox said...

It is a real grower of an album, Rachel. I've just listened to it more and more and more and now it really is one of my favourites. There are a couple more tracks on her myspace page.

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A Cuban In London said...

Loved the Italian pun at the beginning, cara Rachel. :-)

I'm slowly, but surely, falling in love with the folk genre. I admit to be totally bowled over by the traditional Irish songbook. The more I listen to Mary Black (posted about her in my Killer Opening Songs section), the Chieftain et al, the more I get that vibe. With English folk, on the other hand, I will start with Eliza and ease my way in.

Thanks for the clip, it was beautiful.

Greetings from London.

Rachel Fox said...

I totally agree, Cuban...I find Irish and Scottish folk more immediate than English. Saying that English folk I have learned to love includes albums by the Unthanks, June Tabor, Johnny Dickinson (very blues but folky moments), Chris Wood (Trespasser is fantastic), Martin Simpson, Kate Rusby, Pete Morton, Judy Dinning, Bob Fox...so quite a lot really and that's just my first look at the cds on my shelf here. It has taken me a while to like the sound of Eliza Carthy's voice but I am getting there - I like the sound of the new Imagined Village stuff and she's on that.

kimber the wolfgrrrl said...

Beautiful! Thank you for sharing this -- I'll look for more of dear Cara!

Rachel Fox said...

Glad to introduce you.
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